Last week, the web community was shocked to hear rumors that Microsoft’s Edge Browser would be adopting a new engine based on Chromium. Though just rumors at first, Microsoft has come forward and confirmed that it is indeed going to be rebuilding Edge with Chromium.
Read more…


Something we don’t talk enough about at Ionic is how important it is that Ionic is 100% focused on standard web technology. Some thoughts on why that matters:

To sum it up:

By being based on standard web technology, Ionic (and Ionic 4 in particular):

  • Will run for decades to come as web standards endure for a long time
  • Doesn’t require making a major bet on a new, unproven platform because it’s based on sound, stable web standards
  • Can be used by any web developer with standard web development skills
  • Works on mobile, installed desktop, and the web (Progressive Web Apps anyone?) with full code “sharing” because you’re just targeting the web platform!
  • Can take advantage of major new distribution channels such as Progressive Web Apps that are transforming businesses
  • Will work with all existing web libraries, frameworks, and widgets, preventing your team from being siloed off from the largest platform of shared libraries and utilities in the world.

So, yea, we’re pretty proud of being the Web Native leader and with our latest efforts to move Ionic Framework to Web Components, our investment in the web is just getting started.


Whether you’re a lead engineer, an architect, or the head of application development, when you commit to a development stack, you’re putting a lot on the line. Time, people, money, and maybe even your reputation.

Choosing one development approach over another is not just about your personal preference–it’s about risk.

When considering Ionic for a new development initiative, for example, you might ask…

  • Will I be able to access all the native features I need?
  • Will it work on the platforms I care about?
  • Will it integrate with my legacy systems and backend services?
  • Will I have to migrate my entire project when a new version comes out?
  • Do my people have the skill set to execute on this? Will they enjoy it?

Given the enormous pressure put on app development teams to pick the right solution, we understand the need for more than just a casual assurance that Ionic will work for you. That’s why we’re introducing our latest product built for the enterprise, with stability and security in mind.

Read more…


If you’re building apps in an enterprise environment, you’ve probably experienced the growing divide between the number of mobile use cases identified for development, and the capacity of the development team to deliver. Some teams have as many as 50-60 apps waiting for development.

Of course, a big selling point of Ionic is that we help you build apps faster: Write once, run anywhere, using common web languages that you already know and love. But, we know there’s more to it than that.

No matter how skilled you might be, it can still feel like you spend half your time paging back and forth between your code editor and the developer docs, asking yourself: Which component should I use? What’s the right syntax? Where does that header go? And so on… Not to mention stuff like managing plugins or figuring out how to integrate with a new backend service.

Well, I’m happy to announce that the team at Ionic has just introduced a new solution, Ionic Studio, designed to take all that extra stuff off your plate so you tackle your app backlog while we take care of the rest.

Read more…


Like most dev teams, you’re probably on some form of an agile cadence, releasing working versions of your code every 1-2 weeks. In fact, most teams have it down pretty well by now: Backlog grooming, thorough sprint planning, velocity reviews and retros—the whole nine yards.

But, how often are you actually shipping these updates to users? And more than that, how much strain and pressure does this actually put on your team?

If you’re like 50 percent* of large enterprises, you’re likely shipping code four times per year or less. So while most of us are completing new features and bug fixes every few weeks, the actual process of packaging up all those updates into a new native build, submitting the updated binary to the app stores for approval, and getting users to download and start benefiting from the new code is often measured in months or quarters.

What this means is that despite working in sprints or having an agile team approach: It’s not enough. For your users to really feel the impact of your updates, you should be shipping new features and fixes at the same rate your team is developing them.

At Ionic, we’ve been thinking about this a lot.

Just like any development team, we appreciate truly agile processes that allow us to more easily provide users with the experiences they crave. That’s why we revamped our latest product with a DevOps philosophy in mind to better enable teams to make changes and ship updates at the speed of development—without having to be a DevOps expert.

Introducing Ionic Appflow

With that said, we’re incredibly excited to introduce a new product for Ionic developers: Ionic Appflow. 🎉

appflow screenshot

Put simply, Appflow is a DevOps solution for businesses building apps with Ionic. It helps teams increase agility, app quality, and time-to-market by automating key phases of the development lifecycle.

Read more…


👋 if you’re new here, Capacitor is the latest project from the team behind Ionic Framework that provides an abstraction on top of Native SDKs so you can write modern web apps and access any Native SDK through a cross-platform, portable layer. Capacitor apps work on iOS, Android, Electron, and the web as a PWA.

Read more…


Last week, we gave the first official preview of Vue support for Ionic Framework at VueConf Toronto. Our very own Josh Thomas (@jthoms1) shared some insight into the first alpha release of @ionic/vue and why we think Vue + Ionic Framework makes a perfect match for developers. But before we dive into the nitty-gritty of it all, it’s important to first understand the history of Ionic Framework and Vue.

Read more…


Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve likely heard the phrase DevOps. It’s kind of become a squishy and often overused term, yet most people (my fellow developers included) still don’t seem to know what it really means, nor the impact it can have on the business. 

Since DevOps has become a passion of mine recently, I thought I’d write this post to help explain what it is, and more importantly, help other developers make the business case for DevOps in their own organization. Spoiler alert: It has a less to do with the common “more frequent releases & less bugs” argument and more to do with revenue.

Read more…


A bet on the web is a bet you can’t lose.

This has long been our mantra at Ionic. Whether it’s our love for PWAs or web components, we’re continuing to double down on the web as we head into 2019.

And today, we’re happy to announce that two Ionic faves, yours truly and Mike Hartington, are launching a new project with the goal of further amplifying our web-bet message: the Bet on the Web podcast.

Doesn’t everyone have a podcast these days? Probably, but this one is different. Instead of yet another “Technology X Show”, we’ll be chatting about a variety of topics through the lens of the Open Web. Expect to hear from the core Ionic team, as well as other industry leaders as we examine important industry trends, share thought-leadership ideas, and debate the latest technology shaping the web platform landscape.

Read more…


Hey there, friends! We’re back at it again with a new beta release of Ionic 4, Beta 15. This release includes several new changes that we thought would be great to talk about, so let’s jump right into it!

Read more…


Ionic Blog RSS Feed